Posts Tagged ‘learning’

Monthly Reflection #9 – Refocusing on UE4 and Going to USA

Written by Zainab Al-Ansari on . Posted in Blog, Reflections

Every last working day of the current month I publish a report reflecting on the previous month. These reflections exist to demonstrate my progress, share my experiences and help transfer what I learn to others.

The Past Month

This November I took time off to prepare for the Bahrain Game Jam 2018, simplified my schedule, tapped into my investments to refocus on learning UE4 and applied for Train Jam 2019’s diversity program.

I’m writing this reflection a bit late because of the game jam ending on 1st of December, and the subsequent chaos that I needed to clear up first.

Against Sahara – Current Status

Didn’t work on the game this month, and have decided to postpone development for awhile and fully focus on simply learning UE4.

I needed to do this move sooner but what stopped me is my lack of cash savings which would’ve lasted me a couple more months at most.

But since then, I decided to cash in my stocks and bonds.

This will cover another year of living expenses, and allow me to focus on improving my UE4 skills and wait on releasing a game just yet.

Learning UE4 – Going Deeper

I have spent this past month mostly reworking my UE4 workflow and upgrading my UE4 development skills.

The difference showed in my Bahrain Game Jam 2018 (BGJ18)’s entry, where if you compare to my previous solo jam entries the upgrade in production values is quite clear.

This is a gameplay video of my BGJ18 solo entry from end of November:

This is a screenshot of my Global Game Jam 2018 solo entry from January:

You can download both and play them to see the difference from here:

Simplifying my Schedule

I’ve decided to let go of “gym day”, and instead start the week every Sunday by studying the business side of things and doing research, while the rest of the week to be spent on whatever project am working on, whether a learning project or a commercial game.

Instead, I’m now doing shorter, more-intense bursts of exercise throughout the day, everyday and don’t count it towards my work schedule.

Applying to Train Jam 2019’s Diversity Program

A couple of weeks ago I saw the application for Train Jam’s diversity program just 2 hours before deadline, and signed up straight away.

The team behind the initiative have accepted me into the program, am going to Chicago and San Francisco on March 2019 if God wills it.

Two of the most difficult aspects of game development in Bahrain and in the region in general, is the severe lack of quality education and access to experienced devs and game publishers or game investors.

Participating in Train Jam as well as attending the Game Developer’s Conference will give me access to all of these!.

Needless to say I’m very excited, and grateful for the opportunity as the game developers community in Bahrain has been trying, and unfortunately failing, to kick-start an industry here and go beyond hobby projects for 6 years and counting, but this might finally be the catalyst towards a real industry here (hopefully).

What’s Next: Going More Advanced in UE4

I’m working on a small 3rd person survival game and plan on working on it throughout December, while going back to Against Sahara afterwards.

This ends this month’s report, hope you enjoyed and if you have any feedback please comment below 🙂 .

The Minimalist Lifestyler Screenshot

Monthly Reflection #6 – I Love Game Jams!

Written by Zainab Al-Ansari on . Posted in Blog, Reflections

Every last working day of the current month I publish a report reflecting on the previous month. These reflections exist to demonstrate my progress, share my experiences and help transfer what I learn to others.

The Past Month

During August I worked on my current flagship project Against Sahara, participated in the Zanga Game Jam 2018 and reviewed my work schedule to come up with something better.

Against Sahara – Current Status

I’ve bought domain name againstsahara.com for its future marketing website (nothing there yet), and I’m in the middle of finalizing the game’s design after building prototypes and testing.

I should be finalizing the design (concept/story/game rules/art/etc.) by 6th September next week.

Zanga Game Jam

The 2018th edition of the Zanga Game Jam happened from Friday 17th to Sunday 19th and we had a local site at Corporate Hub 9 in Amwaj Lagoon – Muharraq.

I joined in with a couple of new devs and built with them The Minimalist Lifestyler around the theme Minimalism.

The Minimalist Lifestyler Screenshot

The Minimalist Lifestyler Screenshot

This jam is the 4th I’ve joined in the past 12 months, and I don’t plan on stopping anytime soon!.

They’re an awesome way to meet and work with new people and play around with fresh ideas 😀 .

New Weekly Schedule for a Healthier Self

I felt like my growth was stagnating and my health was deteriorating slightly, so I decided to experiment with a new weekly schedule.

Starting from last work week of August (26th – 30th), instead of small blocks per day for various activities I separated the week into blocks.

On Sunday it’s Gym Day, when I focus entirely on exercise

Monday is Study Day, where I focus on improving existent skills and learning new ones (currently learning Houdini).

From Tuesday to Thursday is project work, which is mainly business activities for Z’s Laboratories and Against Sahara for now.

The effects so far are promising!, starting the week with heavy exercise left me energized for the rest of the week, and dedicating a specific day(s) for study and work made me more focused and ended up a bit more productive than usual.

But it might just be due to excitement of the change so won’t know for sure till I review results during next month’s reflection.

What’s Next: Learning Houdini & Building Digital Demo of Against Sahara

I’m going through Houdini’s official “Houdini Fundamentals” book at the moment, and plan to complete it by end of September.

I wish to make my own assets for my games and chose Houdini as my tool of choice, so this is in preparation for making Against Sahara’s art.

Once I finalize the game’s design, I’ll start building the final version of the game, starting with a story-less and art-less demo.

This ends this month’s report, hope you enjoyed and if you have any feedback please comment below 🙂 .

How To Learn Game Development Effectively in 8 Simple Steps

Written by Zainab Al-Ansari on . Posted in Blog, Learning

Want to learn to make your own games but confused where to start?

Watching tutorial after tutorial without anything to show for it?

Find yourself in an endless cycle of learning and re-learning, without ever achieving the skill level you want?

 

Then, I wrote this for you.

What this article is about

This won’t be your typical “Pick Engine X” or “Learn to Make Games by Making Your Own Flappy Bird” kind of article.

While those have their value, often times the problem beginners often miss is something a lot more fundamental than what engine to use or how to make a small game.

It’s the HOW, the WHAT, and the WHY you learn.

i.e, your LEARNING skill.

And that skill, in relation to game dev, is what this article is about.

If you actively developed your learning skills in the past and have your own way of learning already, then following my way will do you more harm than good so please don’t apply what’s written here.

About Learning

When it comes to acquiring knowledge, practical or otherwise, there are specific ways and methods that are particularly useful for a certain type of knowledge.

Game dev falls under what I like to call the Maker category.

The Maker category as you can tell from the name, pertains to skills that result in “produce”, as opposed to, say, using the English language and its rules to communicate.

I won’t touch on other types, but the steps written here will be effective on other “Maker” skills like cooking or drawing. Simply change the subject in step 1 and you’ll be good to go.

These steps are like the tip of the iceberg when it comes to learning, they won’t cover everything you need but applying them will still cause drastic changes to your pace and quality of work.

So, let’s get started.

Step #1: Start With the Game.

What’s the game you wish to make?

What got you interested in learning game dev in the first place?

Is there a game that make you go “I wish I could make that!”?

Often times people get interested in making games because of something they played or an idea they had.

If you don’t have a particular game that you want to make, or you have too many, then it’s time to choose.

This game will be your end Goal.

And it better be something that gets your blood boiled, or you might end up quitting half way.

Now, write it down and hang it somewhere you will see it everyday.

Step #2: Dissect it.

List down ALL the skills needed to make your game.

Research as necessary.

Be specific.

“Making game music” isn’t specific, “Making instrumental music using an electric violin for Adventure story-based games” is.

It’s at this step where you will choose the game engine, in case of video games, that’s most appropriate for your game, as well as other tools.

Never again google something as generic as “What’s the best game engine?” or “Is Unity or Unreal better?”.

Game engines, and any other software or hardware you will be using, are tools and whether they are the “best” depends on what you will be making with them.

You wouldn’t say a shovel is better than a spoon now would you? If you’re digging dirt then the shovel is better even though you could still take forever and dig using a spoon.

Step #3: Choose the One.

Out of all the skills you’ve listed in the above list, pick one and learn that, and only that.

I emphasize the only because the fewer and more focused things you learn at once, the faster you will learn overall.

Choose the skill that make up your biggest pain, or what you consider as the most important skill that you have yet to learn for the sake of making your ultimate game.

Step #4: Choose Your Teacher Wisely.

Those random YouTube tutorials you’ve been following are harming you and your game more than you can understand at your current skill level.

While those teaching online (or offline for that matter) usually mean well, if they themselves are just starting to learn or have low to mid skill levels then whether you know it or not they’re teaching you bad habits.

Those bad habits are costing you time now, and might cost you your entire game later.

When choosing an online course, a book or any other learning resource, the first thing you should look at is the author.

Not the cover, not the promises of what you will be learning, not the hours or even the cost.

The author.

That author should be making the sort of things that you want them to teach you to make, at a level that they are considered to be experts in their given industry.

They don’t need to be famous, but they do need to be professionals who know what they’re talking about, and are someone studios/other companies would hire to work for them at senior or executive levels.

For example, let’s say you wish to learn to animate characters. Which would be the better teacher: A professional animator who has been working for Disney for the past 20 years or someone who is a really good teacher and has been teaching animation for several years but without ever having their work in a professional project?.

Of course it’s going to be the Disney animator!.

Even if the animator is a bad teacher, simply watching him/her work for an hour will teach you more than any non-professional could in weeks.

The absolute best choice would be someone who is both a good teacher and a professional.

Pick only one.

Once you chose your teacher/learning resource, make that your only source for learning this particular skill.

Don’t fall into the trap of endlessly switching between courses/books/workshops/whatever.

Just choose one source, a book, or an online course, or a local workshop and learn only from that.

Constantly switching between sources will cost you time and money with little gain, so stick to one and master it.

Be willing to spend.

You won’t find quality learning materials for free, be willing to pay for your education. It’s an investment in your future and dream so don’t skimp.

If you can afford to buy a game you can afford to pay 30$ for a course or a book.

Step #5: Make. And Make it Small.

Hopefully the resource you picked in the previous step is practical in nature and has exercises for you to do (following along a tutorial doesn’t count), but if not then no worries.

Design a very small project to apply the things you learned, or as you learn them.

These exercises shouldn’t take more than a month and preferably only hours or even minutes depending on what the skill is.

Remember, this is only one skill out of many, the goal here is to get you to an adequate level in this particular skill, not someone who would be hired to do this one thing.

As an example, my own current pain skill is lighting and coloring 3D scenes in Unreal Engine 4.

To improve this skill I’m taking color theory and cinematic lighting courses on The Gnomon Workshop while applying what I learn in pre-made scenes from the asset store where I only modify the lighting setup.

Step #6: Reflect.

Log your progress.

It could be in the form of pictures, videos or even tweets, but note what you just did.

At the end of every project, look at where you started and where you are now.

This exercise has two purposes:

  1. Seeing progress from project to project boosts your confidence and enthusiasm to keep learning.
  2. Seeing your progress has stalled will let you look into problems much earlier and point you where you need to go.

You don’t need to share your log with others, but it could help keep you on track.

Step #7: Make it Bigger?.

If this is your first or second skill then skip this step for now.

But if you’ve learned 3+ new skills so far, then it’s time to combine all these separate skills into one bigger project.

Simply putting it all together will be difficult and push your skills into new heights.

An example would be: if so far you learned to 3D model low-poly objects in Blender, then you learned to Texture 3D models, and then learned to Animate 3D characters, then it’s time to design your own low-poly 3D character from scratch, build it and give it life.

Limit the new skills that need to be combined together.

Learn around 3~6 skills at a time before combining them, with a hard top at 10 skills.

Step #8: Rinse & Repeat.

Time to go back to step #3 and choose the next skill to learn!.

One skill and project at a time, and you will reach your goal enshalla.

 

This ends this guide, if you have any comments or clarifications you want then comment below.

And please share to anyone you think would benefit from this post.

Thank you for reading!.

To invest in yourself is the best investment of all! by Randall Tiongson

Monthly Reflection #3 – Invest in Yourself

Written by Zainab Al-Ansari on . Posted in Blog, Reflections

Every last working day of the current month I publish a report reflecting on the previous month. These reflections exist to demonstrate my progress, share my experiences and help transfer what I learn to others.

The Past Month

In May I worked on a Pinball simulation using Unreal Engine 4 as a learning project.

I meant to release the game by the end of the month, and while I did finish it, I just couldn’t publish it.

The UE4 Editor is a Power-Hungry Beast

I own a 9-years-old Dell Inspiron N5010 with a dual core 2.4GHz processor and an ancient AMD Radeon HD 5000 graphics card that, with care and an excellent build quality, is still working flawlessly.

However, it’s well below the recommended hardware requirements for Unreal and, although it runs Unity 3D without any problems, it just can’t handle Unreal at all.

I’ve been working on the lowest editor settings and the most FPS I get is 23.

That wasn’t too bad in the beginning, but later on UE4 proved to be buggy and unstable, constantly freezing and crashing while I work or try to test the game.

The most pain I suffered was when it was time to compile and package my project. Despite it being a small Pinball game, it took hours for a single build, and it often failed with errors that had nothing to do with my actual code 😑 .

So, I gave up.

Instead of wasting so much time (several days so far), I decided to buy a new gaming laptop that more than can handle Unreal.

Gaming laptops are over priced in Bahrain (like, think 2x its actual worth) and my budget is tight, so I bought an Alienware 17 R4 from Amazon for around $1330. Here’s hoping it comes in one piece 🤞.

I’ll be attempting to package the game again when the laptop arrives.

Investment is Key to Growth and Self Fulfillment

If you’re an amateur or hobbyist, then my advice is to stick to what you have till game dev becomes an important part of your daily life.

But, if you’re already committed to becoming a pro and starting your own studio, then it’s extremely important to invest in yourself And your tools.

Never again follow some random tutorial on YouTube or go through low-quality courses just because they’re free.

While their authors mean well, amateurs unintentionally teach some really bad habits that are costing you a ton of time and effort without you realizing it.

Invest in your education and choose courses and books made by experts in their fields, don’t shy away from paying for high quality knowledge.

Also, buy the tools that would greatly improve your workflow.

Whether it’s a Visual Studio plugin that vastly improves your C++ workflow, a license to some expensive software or more capable hardware, investing in your tools and speeding up your work allows you to create more and higher quality content in less time with fewer hiccups.

I can’t emphasize on how important these two points are. If you’re in this for the long run, then not investing might hamper you or downright stop you from achieving your goals.

What’s Next

I completed the 30 Day Blog Transformation Challenge course on Udemy, and while waiting for my new laptop to arrive I’ll be focusing on my blog for a week or two.

I’ll be writing a guide to learning game dev effectively, and will touch on choosing your learning materials in more detail.

Other than that, while working on Pinball the skill I lacked the most was coloring and lighting. I will subscribe to Gnomon’s Workshop and do their color courses.

I’m planning on using Houdini in my work too for creating assets and VFX, so I’ll go through Gnomon’s Houdini fundamentals course as well.

To know when I post my guide or other articles, subscribe to my RSS feed or newsletter .

Monthly Reflection #2 – Starting Small

Written by Zainab Al-Ansari on . Posted in Blog, Reflections

Every last working day of the current month I publish a report reflecting on the previous month. These reflections exist to demonstrate my progress, share my experiences and help transfer what I learn to others.

The Past Month

During April I focused on learning the basics of Unreal Engine 4, mainly the editor and Blueprints. If you read my previous reflection, you’d note I had planned to make a small mobile game that helps players de-stress.

However, after researching stress, its causes and ways to combat it and designing as small of a game as I could manage that would fulfill that purpose, I quickly realized my technical skills (especially in UE4), are not up to the task.

So, I switched strategies and focused completely on developing my technical skills by making a series of small projects, and have no intention of commercializing them.

My First UE4 Project: A Basic Room Visualization

No code, no Blueprints, no gameplay or asset making, focusing completely on learning the very basics of Unreal Engine 4, which is the level editor.

A 2-week project where I made a basic room using pre-made assets.

Things I learned from this:

My Second UE4 Project: A Pinball Machine Simulation

After achieving level 1 on my previous project, level 2 would be to learn to develop actual gameplay using Blueprints as well as creating custom materials.

For that purpose I’m making a Pinball machine simulation. This project is still ongoing, you can see my current progress below:

Note: I mistakenly wrote Day 4 in the tweet, but it's actually Day 5

Writing Better Blog Posts

Beside game development, I’ve been going through the 30 Day Blog Transformation Challenge course on Udemy.

My wish is to write better, more engaging blog posts that are more useful to you.

I would greatly appreciate any feedback in this regard, and if you have any requests for content you wish to see from me, please do ask.

What’s Next

The plan for next month is to finish the Pinball Simulation project.

I haven’t decided what to do after finishing the Pinball game yet, depending on my skill level at that point, I will either get started on my first commercial game or do another learning project.

This ends this month’s report. Your comments and feedback would be greatly appreciated, so do comment below. 🙂

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